Eppert Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy is a health profession that improves function and independence with activities of daily living. These activities include work, school, leisure, play and self-care activities. For the young child, whose "occupation" is the development of life skills, occupational therapy focuses on gaining competency with motor skills, play skills, self-help skills, and school-related activities.

Fine Motor/Visual Motor Evaluation and Treatment

These services are recommended for children having difficulty with fine motor dexterity tasks like using a pincer grasp, manipulating small objects, buttoning, tying shoes, or using both hands effectively. These services also address struggles with school-based activities like coloring, writing, and cutting with scissors. This may also include oculomotor problems that affect functional vision.

Visual Perception Evaluation and Treatment

These services are recommended for children having difficulty with processing visual information even though there is no underlying visual acuity deficit or acuity has been corrected with glasses. This includes the areas of visual discrimination, visual memory, directionality, figure-ground, visual closure and spatial awareness skills, which are essential to academic skills such as reading, writing, and math.

Sensory Feeding Evaluation and Treatment

These services are recommended for children identified as "picky eaters" with very limited diets, or for children having difficulty transitioning to textured foods or from breast/bottle to a cup. Guidelines for this identification include inability to transition to purees by 10 months, table food solids by 12 months, or breast/bottle to a cup and completely off baby foods by 16 months. The child may demonstrate refusal to eat, crying at meals, increased gagging or vomiting, poor weight gain, history of GI reflux, or control behaviors as mealtime.

Sensory Processing Evaluation and Treatment

These services are recommended for children having difficulty with processing sensory information to the extent that it interferes with the child's ability to participate or enjoy typical childhood activities. The child has difficulty responding in an adaptive way to everyday sensations that others hardly notice or take in stride. Generally, the red flags are unusual responses to oral, tactile, proprioceptive (deep pressure), and vestibular (balance and movement) sensations. We describe this to parents as "the sensations of touching and being touched, moving and being moved." Sensory processing is also strongly connected to a child's self-regulation, arousal levels, and attention. Sensory processing disorders may or may not be associated with other developmental delays.

To learn more about our occupational therapy services, please contact us at 615.376.3045 or contact@wordofmouthca.com.

Read about other services offered at Word of Mouth